Egg Freezing

Egg freezing is one way of preserving a woman’s fertility so she can try to have a family in the future. It’s becoming more successful but it’s by no means a guarantee of having a baby.

It involves collecting a woman’s eggs, freezing them, and then thawing them later so they can be used in fertility treatment.

A woman’s chances of conceiving naturally fall as she gets older because the quality and number of her eggs drops. Egg freezing can be an attempt to preserve fertility by freezing the eggs when the woman is younger and the eggs are of the highest quality.

Egg Freezing 

Egg freezing is one way of preserving a woman’s fertility so she can try to have a family in the future. It’s becoming more successful but it’s by no means a guarantee of having a baby.

It involves collecting a woman’s eggs, freezing them, and then thawing them later so they can be used in fertility treatment.

A woman’s chances of conceiving naturally fall as she gets older because the quality and number of her eggs drops. Egg freezing can be an attempt to preserve fertility by freezing the eggs when the woman is younger and the eggs are of the highest quality.

It is important to research this treatment carefully to source the right services and to consider the implications that fertility tests and treatment might have on you physically and psychologically.

Please do talk to our Team to discuss if this is something you’d like to explore further so we can advise you on the best steps forward.

Is egg freezing right for me?

​You might want to consider freezing your eggs if:

You have a medical condition or need treatment for a medical condition that will affect your fertility, such as cancer (in this case NHS funding may be available depending on where you live).

You’re worried about your fertility declining but you’re not ready to have a child or you haven’t found the right partner – this is often called ‘elective egg freezing’

You’re at risk of injury or death (for example, you’re a member of the Armed Forces who is being deployed to a war zone).

If you’re a female transitioning to a male, you may want to preserve your fertility before you start hormone therapy or have reconstructive surgery. Both treatments can lead to the partial or total loss of your fertility.

You don’t want to have leftover embryos after IVF treatment for ethical reasons.

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